antheia

Ask me anything   I'm a lady, assface.

twitter.com/antheia:

    Most nights for the past several months, I’ve found myself up later than I should be, terrified that one of the illnesses/problems I’ve had in the last year or so is coming back (usually kidney stones). I’m working with my therapist on it, but it’s awful. Not in any small part because I’m aware that it’s almost certainly just paranoia running rampant. And man, knowing that you’re being really crazy just makes it worse.

    I just had to get it off my chest.

    — 7 hours ago

    ayothewuisback:

    "It’s not about race!"

    So I guess the Ku Klux Klan showed up for some fresh air, then?

    (via inlovewiththepractice)

    — 11 hours ago with 15203 notes
    #I'm all queued up 

    lauth:

    request from anon:

    hmm maybe for a steve/bucky prompt request thingy, steve cooking bucky pancakes for breakfast, and bucky with a man bun, leaning against the counter nearby him drinking coffee? best friends doin best friend domestic things yanno
    domesticity is my weakness

    (via ohvegeta)

    — 11 hours ago with 5444 notes
    #captain america  #art  #I'm all queued up 
    inaneenglish:

etharei:

novacorps:

if you find yourself in times of trouble just remember that cap has a tactic where he basically throws himself in some guy’s arms while fighting

I WANT TO SEE HIM DO THIS WITH THE WINTER SOLDIER.
Except the Winter Soldier is actually able take Steve’s weight (especially since if Steve does it like in the gif it’ll be the metal arm getting most of it)
and the two of them just freeze
Steve slowly realizing he’s being carried bridal style
Bucky the Winter Soldier blinking like MY PROGRAMMING DID NOT COVER THIS???
and there’s a bunch of camera sound effects as Natasha flips past with her phone out

That’s a really cute idea, but Cap’s not actually throwing himself into the guy’s arms. He’s jumping up, then using his body weight to bring the guy down and flip him. It’s one of the many things I LOVE about Cap’s fighting style; he doesn’t just use brute force to subdue opponents. He fights intelligently, using moves like this to minimize energy expended while maximizing force output. Also, see how he places the shield under his body and rolls to protect himself as he hits the ground hard? That minimizes his recovery time so he can spring back up and take down the next bad guy.
I love all the fight choreography in Lemurian Star scene, because Steve is brutal and smart throughout. I know some people didn’t appreciate just how vicious he was (see: the bit where he threw a knife into the dude’s hand so the alarm wasn’t sounded), but this guy led a covert guerrilla unit behind enemy lines in WWII. Of course he knows how to fight in a quiet and efficient way. 

    inaneenglish:

    etharei:

    novacorps:

    if you find yourself in times of trouble just remember that cap has a tactic where he basically throws himself in some guy’s arms while fighting

    I WANT TO SEE HIM DO THIS WITH THE WINTER SOLDIER.

    Except the Winter Soldier is actually able take Steve’s weight (especially since if Steve does it like in the gif it’ll be the metal arm getting most of it)

    and the two of them just freeze

    Steve slowly realizing he’s being carried bridal style

    Bucky the Winter Soldier blinking like MY PROGRAMMING DID NOT COVER THIS???

    and there’s a bunch of camera sound effects as Natasha flips past with her phone out

    That’s a really cute idea, but Cap’s not actually throwing himself into the guy’s arms. He’s jumping up, then using his body weight to bring the guy down and flip him. It’s one of the many things I LOVE about Cap’s fighting style; he doesn’t just use brute force to subdue opponents. He fights intelligently, using moves like this to minimize energy expended while maximizing force output. Also, see how he places the shield under his body and rolls to protect himself as he hits the ground hard? That minimizes his recovery time so he can spring back up and take down the next bad guy.

    I love all the fight choreography in Lemurian Star scene, because Steve is brutal and smart throughout. I know some people didn’t appreciate just how vicious he was (see: the bit where he threw a knife into the dude’s hand so the alarm wasn’t sounded), but this guy led a covert guerrilla unit behind enemy lines in WWII. Of course he knows how to fight in a quiet and efficient way. 

    — 12 hours ago with 62020 notes
    #what ally said 
    theroguefeminist:

elliedoh:

So when Miley Cyrus or Katy Perry bring black girls on stage, dance with them, acknowledge their figures- it’s offensive and appropriating. But, when Nicki Minaj makes an entire video focusing around black girl’s asses and asserts her power, reduces these women to objects and flaunts her authority it’s YAAASSSSS NICKI SERVE IT. Is that because she’s black? So it’s okay for people of the same race to dance with each other but someone who does not share the same levels of melanin enters the picture, they’re doing something wrong? …idgi 

You’re completely ignoring context. In Lily Allen’s Hard out Here video, she literally says, “I don’t shake my ass cause I have a brain” as Black women shake their asses in her video. She is literally degrading the Black women who shake their asses in the media. The song also uses references to Black rappers (i.e. the title of the song referencing the rap song “Hard out Here for a Pimp” and her lyric “bragging ‘bout my cars or talking ‘bout my chains”), suggesting that Black rappers are more sexist than white male musicians (which isn’t true, there’s lots of sexism in all music genres) and also suggest the source of sexism in the music industry is Black people (Black male rappers and twerking Black female dancers).
In contrast, Nicki Minaj is reclaiming a song (Baby Got Back) that was made by a Black male rapper who celebrated (but also objectified) Black female bodies. Throughout her song, Nicki raps like a man would, talking about her sexual conquests with men and the size of their dicks, almost as a way of doing to men what they have done to women (objectifying their dicks as Sir Mix A Lot objectified Black women’s asses and many other men objectify women’s vaginas). She also brags about her sexual prowess and stays in control and aggressive in the video (she goes as far as cutting a banana representing a dick and slapping Drake’s hand away—the video critiques the male gaze). The target of mockery and disparagement in Nicki’s video is men and the male gaze, and the video works to reclaim agency from it.
In what way is Nicki asserting power over her dancers? In her video, she twerks along side her back up dancers and dances with them and interacts with them on the same level. She is just as scantily clad as they are. Lily Allen, however, stays fully covered in her video, does not dance provocatively, and thus contrasts her own pure and respectable femininity with the Black women, using their twerking and scantily clad bodies as an example of “bad” female sexuality and femininity—of women “objectifying themselves.” This is racist because it frames Black female sexuality as lesser than white femininity and antithetical to feminism.
In summary: Nicki’s video is very much a celebration of female Black beauty and sexuality coming from a Black woman. Conversely, Lilly Allen’s is using Black women as props to frame them as a vile or bad form of sexuality or being too sexual to prop up her own feminism.
So you might say, “what about Miley Cyrus? she twerks along side her Black background dancers too!” But here’s the problem: Miley Cyrus continually appropriates Black culture and also uses Black women as props. It does matter that these artists are white because in these cases the point of including the Black women is either to, in Lily Allen’s case, offset Black sexuality/femininity as too sexual or bad in comparison with her white femininity/feminism, or, in the case of Miley Cyrus, to get “street cred” and exotify her own sexuality by appropriating Black culture and using Black people as props to do so. See this analysis of Lily Allen’s Hard Out Here video and this analysis of Miley Cyrus by Black people who know a lot more about this than I do.
I haven’t seen anything about Katy Perry using Black dancers. I’ve just seen criticisms of her appropriating AAVE and other PoC cultures. So I’m not sure why you brought her up, but maybe I just haven’t seen the videos in question.
Either way, it’s not like white artists having a diverse cast of back up dancers is a bad thing automatically. Here is an example of a white artist using back up dancers of other races without objectifying them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ilh1ewceco (notice this artist tackles the same issue as Lily Allen—sexism/objectification in the media—without being misogynist and racist toward other women). But the examples of Lily Allen and Miley Cyrus ARE racist and Nicki Minaj’s video isn’t the same as theirs.

    theroguefeminist:

    elliedoh:

    So when Miley Cyrus or Katy Perry bring black girls on stage, dance with them, acknowledge their figures- it’s offensive and appropriating. But, when Nicki Minaj makes an entire video focusing around black girl’s asses and asserts her power, reduces these women to objects and flaunts her authority it’s YAAASSSSS NICKI SERVE IT. Is that because she’s black? So it’s okay for people of the same race to dance with each other but someone who does not share the same levels of melanin enters the picture, they’re doing something wrong? …idgi 

    You’re completely ignoring context. In Lily Allen’s Hard out Here video, she literally says, “I don’t shake my ass cause I have a brain” as Black women shake their asses in her video. She is literally degrading the Black women who shake their asses in the media. The song also uses references to Black rappers (i.e. the title of the song referencing the rap song “Hard out Here for a Pimp” and her lyric “bragging ‘bout my cars or talking ‘bout my chains”), suggesting that Black rappers are more sexist than white male musicians (which isn’t true, there’s lots of sexism in all music genres) and also suggest the source of sexism in the music industry is Black people (Black male rappers and twerking Black female dancers).

    In contrast, Nicki Minaj is reclaiming a song (Baby Got Back) that was made by a Black male rapper who celebrated (but also objectified) Black female bodies. Throughout her song, Nicki raps like a man would, talking about her sexual conquests with men and the size of their dicks, almost as a way of doing to men what they have done to women (objectifying their dicks as Sir Mix A Lot objectified Black women’s asses and many other men objectify women’s vaginas). She also brags about her sexual prowess and stays in control and aggressive in the video (she goes as far as cutting a banana representing a dick and slapping Drake’s hand away—the video critiques the male gaze). The target of mockery and disparagement in Nicki’s video is men and the male gaze, and the video works to reclaim agency from it.

    In what way is Nicki asserting power over her dancers? In her video, she twerks along side her back up dancers and dances with them and interacts with them on the same level. She is just as scantily clad as they are. Lily Allen, however, stays fully covered in her video, does not dance provocatively, and thus contrasts her own pure and respectable femininity with the Black women, using their twerking and scantily clad bodies as an example of “bad” female sexuality and femininity—of women “objectifying themselves.” This is racist because it frames Black female sexuality as lesser than white femininity and antithetical to feminism.

    In summary: Nicki’s video is very much a celebration of female Black beauty and sexuality coming from a Black woman. Conversely, Lilly Allen’s is using Black women as props to frame them as a vile or bad form of sexuality or being too sexual to prop up her own feminism.

    So you might say, “what about Miley Cyrus? she twerks along side her Black background dancers too!” But here’s the problem: Miley Cyrus continually appropriates Black culture and also uses Black women as props. It does matter that these artists are white because in these cases the point of including the Black women is either to, in Lily Allen’s case, offset Black sexuality/femininity as too sexual or bad in comparison with her white femininity/feminism, or, in the case of Miley Cyrus, to get “street cred” and exotify her own sexuality by appropriating Black culture and using Black people as props to do so. See this analysis of Lily Allen’s Hard Out Here video and this analysis of Miley Cyrus by Black people who know a lot more about this than I do.

    I haven’t seen anything about Katy Perry using Black dancers. I’ve just seen criticisms of her appropriating AAVE and other PoC cultures. So I’m not sure why you brought her up, but maybe I just haven’t seen the videos in question.

    Either way, it’s not like white artists having a diverse cast of back up dancers is a bad thing automatically. Here is an example of a white artist using back up dancers of other races without objectifying them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Ilh1ewceco (notice this artist tackles the same issue as Lily Allen—sexism/objectification in the media—without being misogynist and racist toward other women). But the examples of Lily Allen and Miley Cyrus ARE racist and Nicki Minaj’s video isn’t the same as theirs.

    (via rob-anybody)

    — 12 hours ago with 48714 notes
    #I'm all queued up 

    socialjusticekoolaid:

    Love “Da Man Wit the Chips” but Jameila White is the new “Protest MVP.” #staywoke #trill 

    (via howling-at-the-stars)

    — 15 hours ago with 116548 notes
    #I'm all queued up